WPP Publications search results

Your search yielded the following 66 publications:
(2015)
Today, with the earth warming faster than previously thought, large changes in temperature and precipitation have brought about even more uncertainty concerning the future of our water resources. The primary challenge of achieving water security is our ability to make decisions in the present that sufficiently account for the needs of the future. This becomes particularly important in water projects that involve investments in long-lived infrastructure. which must deliver benefits for many generations to come. Resilient infrastructure will enable countries to respond to floods and droughts, sea level rise, and unpredictable river runoff, and to bring clean and safe water to those currently without access. But how do we ensure that our investments are resilient to climate risks? How do we make climate-smart policy choices against a backdrop of uncertainty?
(2015)
How can water resource agencies make smart investments to ensure long-term water reliability when the future is fraught with deep climate and economic uncertainty? Water resource agencies around the world are grappling with this question at a time of unprecedented water stress, growing demands, uncertain climate change, and limited budgets.
(2015)
One of the most severe multi-year droughts in decades has plagued Northeast Brazil since 2010. An already dry region got even drier, threatening hydropower supplies in areas already disposed to blackouts and making food even harder to grow. Low rainfall is affecting agricultural produce such as crop, cotton and cane which is slowing economic growth across the region. Thousands of farmers and their families in the poor rural communities living in the semi-arid are seeing their livelihoods fade away. Proactive drought management and having mechanisms to better anticipate and prepare for droughts will help the region build resilience and protect hard-earned development gains.
(2015)
The Efficient and Sustainable River Basin Operational Services in Indonesia study was initiated at the request of the Director-General for Water Resources of the Government of Indonesia to assess the current approaches to river basin operational management and to provide recommendations for enhancement.
(2015)
The WPP report, Water Security for All: The Next Wave of Tools outlines Phase II of the program and summarizes its achievements and impact from January 2013 through June 2014. The report showcases how the WPP enables the Bank’s Water Global Practice to become a knowledge incubator and achieve results across regions in areas calling for immediate action, such as climate change, energy and food security, and urban water management. It also demonstrates how programmatic approaches implemented through global initiatives can help countries to anticipate the future and better prepare for it.
(2014)
Sanitation services in many East Asian cities struggle to keep pace with rapid urban growth. The East Asia Urban Sanitation Review (World Bank 2013) showed the enormous challenges the sanitation sector faces in most urban areas in the region, primarily excessive dependence on defective onsite sanitation in cities with high population densities and persistently low wastewater collection and treatment coverage levels. This technical note explores in greater depth the production of energy in wastewater treatment plants as an option to save costs in the operation of these facilities.
(2014)
Supported by the Water Partnership Program, this book summarizes alternatives explored by a group of organizations (such as the U.S. Corps of Engineers, Conservation International, the University of Massachusetts and the Bank) all belonging to the Alliance for Global Water Adaptation (AGWA), to provide practitioners with the tools to adapt to the realities of climate change by following a decision-making process that incorporates bottom-up thinking.
(2014)
Supported by the Word Bank’s Water Partnership Program, the report The Hydropower Sustainability Assessment Protocol for use by World Bank Clients attempts to provide answers to these questions. It also aims to shed light on the complementarity of the Protocol to existing World Bank policies and procedures and issues covered by its Environmental and Social Safeguards and Performance Standards, as well as to provide guidance on the Protocol’s application by World Bank clients.
(2014)
Supported by the World Bank’s Water Partnership Program, the report How to assess agricultural water productivity? Looking for water in the agricultural productivity and efficiency literature, aims to contribute to the discussion on how to assess and possibly improve agricultural water productivity. It presents findings from a first attempt to survey the agricultural productivity and efficiency literature with regard to the explicit inclusion of water aspects in productivity and efficiency measurements.
(2014)
Results-based financing (RBF) is an effective approach for achieving better quality and timely delivery of services in development projects. RBF has been mostly used for water supply and sanitation investments but some questions remain unanswered on the operational dimensions of RBF in other water sub-sectors, such as irrigation, flood protection, water conservation and hydropower. The Water Partnership Program (WPP) and the Global Partnership on Output-Based Aid (GPOBA) joint study (Applying Results-Based Financing in Water Investments) takes a closer look at some of the practical aspects of implementing various RBF schemes in water-related investments, from access to water services and household sewage connections to irrigation and deforestation.
(2014)
This report outlines the proposal for the development of Mexico's Financial System for Water (Sistema de Financiamiento del Agua or SFA). Funded by the Spanish Fund for Latin America and the Caribbean (SFLAC) and the World Bank’s Water Partnership Program (WPP), the report examines the SFA through basic concepts and its current legal framework, while offering suggestions on the existing instruments and mechanisms that could provide access to various sources of financial resources towards the water sector.
(2014)
The aim of this study is to assess the impact of the pro-poor policies introduced by the National Water and Sewerage Corporation (NWSC) between 2004 and 2010. The study analyzes the effectiveness, efficiency, and equity of these policies and strategies implemented by the Government of Uganda and NWSC to increase coverage of urban water supply services in poor settlements. The study focuses exclusively on the area of Kampala city, the capital of Uganda, as this constitutes the largest service area of the NWSC - with approximately 60 percent of its connections and 64 percent of its revenues. The assessment of the impact of the pro-poor policies on the poor in Kampala is based on an analysis of the effectiveness, the efficiency, and the equity of these policies since 2004.
(2013)
The tradeoffs between energy and water have been gaining international attention in recent years as demand for both resources mount and governments continue to struggle to ensure reliable supply to meet sectoral needs.
(2013)
The Water Partnership Program (WPP) was instrumental in identifying pollution hotspots for priority investments in the eastern Adriatic.
(2013)
This technical report deals with the estimation of design floods and monthly flows in a river basin taking into consideration the effect of climate variability and change. It also focuses on the evaluation of the impact of climate fluctuations on the structures of both dry and humid ecosystems.
(2013)
The WET is an Expert Support Team funded by the Water Partnership Program (WPP), a Multi-Donor Trust Fund created to enhance the World Bank’s efforts to reduce poverty through improved water services and Water Resources Management.
(2012)
The WPP Supports the first application of consumption-based water rights administration in China.
(2012)
The objective of this Guidance Note: Public Expen¬diture Review from the Perspective of the Water Sup¬ply and Sanitation Sector is to provide World Bank staff with a body of knowledge and good practice guidelines to help them evaluate the allocation of public resources to water and sanitation services in a consistent manner and to increase their knowledge of public expenditure issues in the sector.
(2012)
This report forms part of the GEF-funded project on “Groundwater Governance: A Global Framework for Country Action” under the International Waters focal area, and includes partners from the FAO, GEF-IW, IAH, UNESCO-IHP and the Bank. The project includes a broad review of issues, challenges and lessons drawing from national and transboundary case studies. This report is one of twelve thematic papers and has a specific focus on the political economy of groundwater governance.