WPP Publications search results

Your search yielded the following 55 publications:
(2014)
The aim of this study is to assess the impact of the pro-poor policies introduced by the National Water and Sewerage Corporation (NWSC) between 2004 and 2010. The study analyzes the effectiveness, efficiency, and equity of these policies and strategies implemented by the Government of Uganda and NWSC to increase coverage of urban water supply services in poor settlements. The study focuses exclusively on the area of Kampala city, the capital of Uganda, as this constitutes the largest service area of the NWSC - with approximately 60 percent of its connections and 64 percent of its revenues. The assessment of the impact of the pro-poor policies on the poor in Kampala is based on an analysis of the effectiveness, the efficiency, and the equity of these policies since 2004.
(2013)
The tradeoffs between energy and water have been gaining international attention in recent years as demand for both resources mount and governments continue to struggle to ensure reliable supply to meet sectoral needs.
(2013)
The Water Partnership Program (WPP) was instrumental in identifying pollution hotspots for priority investments in the eastern Adriatic.
(2013)
This technical report deals with the estimation of design floods and monthly flows in a river basin taking into consideration the effect of climate variability and change. It also focuses on the evaluation of the impact of climate fluctuations on the structures of both dry and humid ecosystems.
(2013)
The WET is an Expert Support Team funded by the Water Partnership Program (WPP), a Multi-Donor Trust Fund created to enhance the World Bank’s efforts to reduce poverty through improved water services and Water Resources Management.
(2012)
The WPP Supports the first application of consumption-based water rights administration in China.
(2012)
The objective of this Guidance Note: Public Expen¬diture Review from the Perspective of the Water Sup¬ply and Sanitation Sector is to provide World Bank staff with a body of knowledge and good practice guidelines to help them evaluate the allocation of public resources to water and sanitation services in a consistent manner and to increase their knowledge of public expenditure issues in the sector.
(2012)
This report forms part of the GEF-funded project on “Groundwater Governance: A Global Framework for Country Action” under the International Waters focal area, and includes partners from the FAO, GEF-IW, IAH, UNESCO-IHP and the Bank. The project includes a broad review of issues, challenges and lessons drawing from national and transboundary case studies. This report is one of twelve thematic papers and has a specific focus on the political economy of groundwater governance.
(2012)
This study reviews the experience of cooperation in five international river basins, focusing on the perceptions of risks and opportunities by decision makers in countries responding to a specific prospect of cooperation. For each basin, the analysis centered on “tipping points,” or periods in time when policymakers in the countries involved were faced with a critical decision concerning water cooperation. The use of historical events helped avoid the risk that the analyses would impact current negotiations or controversies. River basins selected for the analysis were: Eastern Nile, Ganges, Niger, Syr Darya, and Zambezi.
(2012)
By 2030, Africa’s urban population will double, and the difficulties African cities currently face in providing sustainable water services will be exacerbated. The Future of Water in African Cities: Why Waste Water? argues that the traditional approach of one source, one system, and one discharge cannot close the water gap. A more integrated, sustainable, and flexible approach, which takes into account new concepts such as water fit to a purpose, is needed in African cities. The Report provides examples of cities in Africa and beyond that have already implemented Integrated Urban Water Management (IUWM) approaches both in terms of technical and institutional solutions. Case studies explore the ways in which IUWM can help meet future water demand in African cities.
(2012)
In China’s countryside, environmental pollution poses a serious threat to the region’s development. Water scarcity, as well as severe contamination caused by inadequate wastewater management practices, exacerbate poverty and threaten the health of rural populations, particularly children. As of 2010, only 56% of people in rural areas of China had access to improved sanitation. Many villages have no sewage collection, treatment, or disposal facilities.
(2012)
The Rural Water Supply – Volume I “Design Manual” is the first of three volumes from the Small Water Providers Work for the Poor project funded by the Water Partnership Program that provides key concepts and guidance in the design of small waterworks facilities in the Philippines. This manual is a ready resource for owners, operators, technical staff, consultants, government planners and contractors. It also aims to provide assistance to non-technical readers involved in the management and operation of small water supply systems. Its overarching goal is to help these groups to better understand the nature of the water supply business, its responsibilities to stakeholders, and the role of government agencies and regulatory bodies toward sustainable operations. It also itends to facilitate participation in the planning and decision-making of more effective water systems in rural areas and small towns in the Philippines. The handbook is well-received by stakeholders. Endorsed by the President of the Philippines, it was widely distributed on March 22, 2012 during a World Water Day event in Manila involving high-level officials and the World Bank's Country Director. The Government is supporting further dissemination efforts.
(2012)
The study, which was partly funded by the WPP, assessed the health implications of pathogenic contamination of drainage water which is reused in agriculture. The study incorporates an innovative statistical tool, known as Quantifiable Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA), by which the relative effectiveness of different wastewater management strategies can be assessed in terms of optimizing health benefits to downstream populations.
(2011)
Wondering how climate change may affect the watershed or area where your project is? Being asked for advise on the new government policy to expand irrigation? Not sure where to start? The World Bank Water Anchor and a team from Colorado State / MIT have developed a tool to get you started. It is on http://sdwebx.worldbank.org/climateportal/ and described in this publication
(2011)
The WPP 2010 Annual Report provides an overview of the Program’s accomplishments and outlines its future direction. The report provides examples of how the WPP enables the Bank to respond to the emerging needs of its client countries and bring innovative solutions and transformative knowledge to help them resolve complex water challenges.
(2011)
Groundwater has played a significant role in the maintenance of India’s economy, environment, and standard of living. India is the largest groundwater user in the world.
(2011)
The World Bank’s Water Anchor is encouraging Bank staff to discuss and share their work on rural water supply through a new internal social collaboration platform.