Publications - Private Public Partnerships

(2012)
This note reviews public-private partnerships (PPPs) in which the government uses contracts to delegate management responsibilities for rural water supplies to the private sector.
(2011)
"Tapped Out," explores the pragmatic and innovative solutions that the public and private sectors create together to tackle the challenge of water scarcity and distribution.
(2011)
PPIAF support to the Egyptian government has helped lay the groundwork for several public-private partnership (PPP) projects in a variety of sectors. Specifi cally, PPIAF provided support to two PPP transactions in the wastewater sector: the New Cairo Wastewater Treatment Plant, the first PPP in Egypt, and the 6th of October Wastewater Treatment Plant.
(2011)
PPIAF support to the Egyptian government has helped lay the groundwork for several public-private partnership (PPP) projects in a variety of sectors. Specifi cally, PPIAF provided support to two PPP transactions in the wastewater sector: the New Cairo Wastewater Treatment Plant, the first PPP in Egypt, and the 6th of October Wastewater Treatment Plant.
(2010)
Since 1990, many national and local governments in developing countries have contracted with private companies to operate or manage their water utilities under Public-Private Partnership (PPP) contracts. The assumption was that the private sector will improve utilities by bringing in new capital, raising the level of staff expertise, and making operations more cost-effective and efficient.
(2010)
In post-apartheid Johannesburg, South Africa, the city water authority had fallen into disarray (a common situation with urban services). In 2001, a Public-Private Partnership (PPP) emerged as a way to bring new expertise and efficiency to the delivery of public utility services, where a five-year management contract successfully restored services, built local capacity, and helped put Johannesburg Water on a solid footing.
(2010)
Uganda's national water utility has become known for its successful turnaround under public management. Less well known is that this success owes much to the introduction of private-sector-like practices to motivate employees.
(2010)
In 2009 seven low- or middle-income countries implemented 35 water projects with private participation involving investment of almost US$2 billion, according to just-released data from the Private Participation in Infrastructure (PPI) database.
(2010)
In the 1990s a few multinationals dominated the market for public-private partnership (PPP) contracts in water. Yet in recent year's water operators from developing countries have won most of the new PPP contracts for the management of water utilities in countries as diverse as Brazil, Cameroon, Chile, China, Colombia, India, Malaysia, and the Russian Federation.
(2010)
Thanks to a corporatization process spanning two decades, Burkina Faso's national water and sanitation utility ranks among the few well-managed public water utilities in Sub-Saharan Africa. Key to its success has been the government's unceasing commitment to reform, which included the successful implementation of an innovative performance-based service contract with an international operator from 2001 to 2006.
(2010)
There are currently nine active public-private partnerships (PPP) in infrastructure in the region. In South Asia, where more than one billion people live on less than $2 a day, the global downturn is hitting the poorest the hardest.
(2010)
This learning note serves to document the behavior change component of the project in Senegal, including key strategies, results, challenges, and lessons learned.
(2010)
In cities and towns, private firms and individuals receive contracts to build, operate, and maintain municipal water supplies as an alternative to day-to-day management by local government or user organizations. A literature review has uncovered a wide variety of approaches from around the world for establishing such Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) in rural areas as well.
(2010)
Output-Based Aid (OBA) has been used since the early 2000s to deliver basic infrastructure and social services to the poor, typically through public-private partnerships.
(2010)
The National Office for Potable Water (Office National de l’Eau Potable – ONEP) is the national water supply operator in Morocco, responsible for supplying treated bulk water to urban distributors (“municipal régies” and private operators) and providing service to over 500 medium to small towns. ONEP is overall a high‐capacity agency, ranking among the best performing public operators in the region and competes on the sub‐Saharan public‐private partnership markets.
(2010)
This field note reviews the first generation of Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) for small piped water schemes in seven countries: Benin, Burkina Faso, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Rwanda and Senegal. The field note proposes a framework for moving towards more sustainable piped water PPPs.
(2010)
In 2006 PPIAF helped the Egyptian government develop a conceptual framework and transaction model for implementing a surface water irrigation system in the West Delta region. As a result of this activity, the government adopted a public private partnership model for the project, which was designed as a hybrid scheme based on the design-build-operate model and focused on minimizing tariffs and mitigating risks.
(2009)
Working Note #19. The primary objective of this report is to provide practical guidance to World Bank teams advising on the design and implementation of reforms of urban water supply and sanitation (WSS) sectors. This report includes three main chapters to discuss how to: (i) measure the performance of an urban WSS service; (ii) explain apparent performance gaps, if any; and (iii) design and implement reforms to increase access to the infrastructure, improve the efficiency of operations and enhance the reliability, sustainability and affordability of the service.
(2009)
Discussion Paper #13. Reforming Urban Water Utilities in Western and Central Africa: Experiences with Public-Private Partnerships - Volume 1: Impact and Lessons Learned. Matar Fall, Philippe Marin, Alain Locussol, Richard Verspyck. The Western and Cen
(2009)
Discussion Paper #13a. The Western and Central Africa has one of the longest experiences with public-private partnerships (PPPs) in the developing world, both for water supply and for combined power and water supply utilities. Cote d'Ivoire has a successful partnership dating from 1959, and over the last two decades as many as 15 countries (out of 23 in the region) have experimented with PPPs: eight for water supply operations alone and seven for combined power and water supply operations.